Tag: R1234yf

Mercedes-Benz S-Class with R744 AC system testing at a simulated 32km/h in a chamber set to 40°C and 40% relative humidity.

German brand sharing CO2 tech to accelerate automotive adoption After years of resistance, Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler has finally decided to adopt R1234yf in some models, but only as a stepping-stone towards the range-wide rollout of cars with air conditioning systems using CO2 refrigerant (R744). The first R744-equipped models will be the high-end S-Class and Continue reading Mercedes-Benz adopts R1234yf as CO2 stepping stone

Mario Nappa

Lead chemist in the development of new industry-standard automotive refrigerant R1234yf Mario Nappa has been awarded the 2015 Winthrop-Sears Medal for entrepreneurial achievement. Dr Nappa, who worked with Wire & Gas 2015 keynote speaker Barbara Minor on the R1234yf project, already has quite a collection awards for technical achievement, invention and engineering excellence to go Continue reading R1234yf boffin wins Chemists’ Club medal

Autobahn

There may be media-fuelled public resistance to R1234yf history in Germany – not to mention the refusal by Mercedes-Benz to adopt it and Volkswagen Group’s commitment to CO2 as a refrigerant – but government figures reveal that there are already half a million cars on German roads with the new gas coursing through their air Continue reading 500,000 cars using R1234yf in Germany

Suzuki Vitara refrigerant label

Rodney Smith from CoolCar Air-Conditioning Centre Hamilton conducted a mini survey on New Zealand-new cars displayed at the New Zealand Agricultural Fieldays near Hamilton in June 2015. He wanted to get a feel for what refrigerant was in the air-conditioning of the latest cars and talk to the sales staff on the stands.  A similar review Continue reading Snapshot of NZ new car AC refrigerant

Webb dock in Port Melbourne

The Abbott Government’s proposal to relax new vehicle importation laws and enable personal imports of new cars could accelerate the uptake of R1234yf in Australia if the legislation passes. On some production lines, only models destined for countries where low global warming potential refrigerants are either compulsory or receive fuel efficiency credits are fitted with Continue reading New car import laws could accelerate R1234yf growth in Australia

Barbara H Minor gives R1234yf presentation at Wire & Gas 2015

But even mild flammability made industry acceptance a hard sell A leading engineer behind the development of new industry standard automotive refrigerant R1234yf concedes that flammability is its biggest drawback – but that apart from that it is close to being the perfect gas for car air conditioning systems. During an exclusive interview with SightGlass News at Continue reading R1234yf ‘really close’ to perfect

R1234yf label

Much of the global automotive industry has adopted R1234yf as the standard refrigerant in new cars, primarily due to tightening overseas legislation over the global warming effect of refrigerants released into the atmosphere. R1234yf has a far lower global warming potential than R134a, which has been the sole industry standard refrigerant in automotive air conditioning Continue reading R1234yf Facts