Tag: R1234yf

Lawyer with flammable warning sign

A Flammable Refrigerants Review project being undertaken by Weir Legal & Consulting has found 143 different standards, regulations and laws relating to flammable refrigerants during a ‘stocktake’ of legal instruments that control the heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration industries across every state and territory in Australia. Presenting the research results at a recent CCN Live conference Continue reading Need for flammables licensing highlighted by ‘stocktake’ of standards, regulations and laws

HVACR technician

The New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment is developing new regulations that will require technicians to be licensed by WorkSafe if they work with flammable, toxic or very high operating pressure refrigerant gases in commercial and industrial refrigeration, heating or air-conditioning systems. These regulations are expected to be in place by mid-2021, with Continue reading NZ developing new licensing regulations for flammable, toxic and high-pressure refrigerants

Latest automotive refrigerant survey from RRA

Since 2013, Refrigerant Reclaim Australia has worked with VASA member workshops to conduct regular surveys of which refrigerants are installed in vehicles that are having air-conditioning work done at metropolitan and regional locations around the country. The study records how many vehicles are charged with R134a, R1234yf, hydrocarbons and mixtures of hydrocarbons with other refrigerants. Continue reading Latest automotive refrigerant survey from RRA

Australia’s slow YF uptake hits the headlines

The slow uptake of R1234yf on new light vehicles in Australia, largely caused by manufacturers exploiting a lack of regulation around their role in the HFC phase-down, has hit the headlines in mainstream media this month with articles in The Guardian newspaper and on the WhichCar website under which major automotive publications including Wheels Magazine Continue reading Australia’s slow YF uptake hits the headlines

Cold Hard Facts 2019

The latest Cold Hard Facts refrigerant report commissioned by Australia’s Department of the Environment and Energy has decried sales of new vehicles using R1234yf as “statistically irrelevant in 2018”. “Auto makers appear content to continue to supply models with older generations of refrigerants to any markets that permit HFCs, while making HFO charged models available Continue reading Slow R1234yf uptake called out in Cold Hard Facts

Barbara H Minor

Those who attended the 2015 VASA Wire & Gas convention will remember Barbara H Minor’s fascinating presentation about R1234yf, which she was pivotal in the development of. She has now been honoured with The Science of Chemical Industry (SCI) America Perkin Medal for her contribution to the research and development of refrigerants that address ozone Continue reading R1234yf inventor Barbara H Minor honoured with prestigious Science of Chemical Industry award

Mercedes-Benz S-Class with R744 AC system testing at a simulated 32km/h in a chamber set to 40°C and 40% relative humidity.

German brand sharing CO2 tech to accelerate automotive adoption After years of resistance, Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler has finally decided to adopt R1234yf in some models, but only as a stepping-stone towards the range-wide rollout of cars with air conditioning systems using CO2 refrigerant (R744). The first R744-equipped models will be the high-end S-Class and Continue reading Mercedes-Benz adopts R1234yf as CO2 stepping stone

Mario Nappa

Lead chemist in the development of new industry-standard automotive refrigerant R1234yf Mario Nappa has been awarded the 2015 Winthrop-Sears Medal for entrepreneurial achievement. Dr Nappa, who worked with Wire & Gas 2015 keynote speaker Barbara Minor on the R1234yf project, already has quite a collection awards for technical achievement, invention and engineering excellence to go Continue reading R1234yf boffin wins Chemists’ Club medal

Autobahn

There may be media-fuelled public resistance to R1234yf history in Germany – not to mention the refusal by Mercedes-Benz to adopt it and Volkswagen Group’s commitment to CO2 as a refrigerant – but government figures reveal that there are already half a million cars on German roads with the new gas coursing through their air Continue reading 500,000 cars using R1234yf in Germany